Edinburgh Festival Fringe 2019: 5 of the top rated female comedians you should go and see

The Fringe is well underway and here we round up the female comedians who have received reviews from The Scotsman's critics with four stars or more.

Sara Barron: Enemies Closer
20.30, Pleasance Courtyard – Upstairs (Venue 33)

Picture: Sara Barron

Picture: Sara Barron

What The Scotsman critic said:

****Sara Barron reckons that being in the UK for seven years and in a relationship for eight has sucked the pep out of her, the enthusiasm and entitlement that are otherwise Americans’ manifest destiny… Approaching her fifth decade, the New Yorker is instead sustained by vicariously gorging on her single friends’ romantic humiliations with a schadenfreude bordering on connoisseurship and a clairvoyant’s capacity for judgment… Whether it is the way she talks of summoning up tears for wedding speeches or her how she can’t even manage the modicum of effort it would take to cut her frenemies adrift, Barron isn’t slow in convincing you of, and allying you to, her cynicism. A hasty death is wished for an older relative and we root for her.

You can read the full review here.

Catherine Cohen: The Twist...? She's Gorgeous
22:45, Pleasance Courtyard - Beneath,

Picture: Catherine Cohen

Picture: Catherine Cohen

What The Scotsman critic said:

****“Hot mess” seems an outmoded label for fabulous chanteuse Catherine Cohen. Because if, as she purringly declares, she’s the voice of her generation, this millennial New Yorker has apparently absorbed and erased the boundaries of ironically detached performance… In one important regard Cohen is an absolute throwback, a trouper of the old school, unable to extricate her winning smile from the pain and bewilderment. An hour in her company is a unique and confusing delight.”

You can read the full review here.

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Picture: Sophie Duker

Picture: Sophie Duker

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Sophie Duker: Venus
19.00, Pleasance Courtyard, Edinburgh

What The Scotsman critic said:

****Yas Queen! For the avowedly woke, yet overwhelmingly white, middle-class Edinburgh Fringe, Sophie Duker is festival royalty in-waiting… A queer black woman from a single-parent family with daddy issues on call, she’s nevertheless reassuringly privately educated and an Oxbridge graduate, a highly articulate, charismatic, one-woman stroke of supreme right-on-ness for smug liberal crowds....While ticking the box for an introductory hour of being an affecting account of self-discovery, this is distinctly secondary to the laughs Duker mischievously elicits from would-be white knight saviours and the po-faced woke. A cautionary tale for Meghan Markle, Venus features some exceptionally witty skewering of pop culture and screamingly hilarious insight into the full horrors of Stacey Dooley Syndrome.

You can read the full review here.

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Candy Gigi Presents - Friday Night Sinner!
20.35, Monkey Barrel 5 (Venue 515)

****Wow. Just, wow. I realise that is not a particularly helpful response to a show. But I guarantee it will be yours when you watch the extraordinarily talented Candy Gigi power through the story of a doomed Borehamwood housewife (and murdering psychopath) who just wants to be a star… A glorious big Broadway voice, belting out her very own show tunes along a plotline that hurtles from troubled childhood, showbiz fantasies, a loveless arranged marriage, a desperate bid for stardom and, of course, murder… The entire show is pretty much one huge trigger warning. And it is glorious. It is Little Shop of Horrors with Candy as both Audreys. It is a one psychopath tour de force and she is as ruthless as she is fabulous.

You can read the full review here.

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Josie Long: Tender
20:20, The Stand Comedy Club

What The Scotsman critic said:

****Reframing the concept of edgy comedy to mean sleep-deprived and on the verge of nervous exhaustion, Josie Long is persecuted by her nagging fears about climate change… Her excitability is, however, as infectious as always. And though she scarcely needs it, goodwill towards this goofy optimist is enhanced by the news that she’s had a baby. With some obvious caveats about the apocalypse and acknowledgement that everyone’s experience of parenting is different, Tender is explicitly personal and positive.

You can read the full review here.