New 6ft “Pictish stone” discovered in north of Scotland

The stone, which was found on a building site on the outskirts of Elgin, could be Pictish in origin. PIC: Wayne Miles/Pictish Arts Society.
The stone, which was found on a building site on the outskirts of Elgin, could be Pictish in origin. PIC: Wayne Miles/Pictish Arts Society.
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A new Pictish stone may have been found on a building site in the north of Scotland.

The monument was discovered by amateur metal detectorist Wayne Miles on the site of a new business park outside Elgin, Moray.

The stone, which is around 6ft tall and estimated to weigh around two tonnes, is similar in design to the Dandaleith Stone which was found at Craigellachie, around 13 miles south of Elgin, in 2013.

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Both are decorated with a notched rectangle design and eagle symbol.

David McGovern, vice president of the Pictish Arts Society said the discovery was “potentially very exciting”.

He suggested the recently discovered monument and the Dandaleith stone could have been made by the same carver or workshop.

He added: “It is potentially a specific style of Pictish stone to that area but it does need verification.

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“It is so similar to the Dandaleith stone that as soon as someone showed me the picture, I thought ‘this has come from the same workshop or carver.”

Experts from Scotland’s Treasure Trove, which manages finds of historic and cultural significance, will now work to confirm whether the stone is authentic.

It was found by Mr Miles in a field close to Barmuckity Business Park, which is under construction just outside the town.

Mr Miles described the find as a “once in a lifetime” discovery.

He told The Press and Journal: “There is quite stunning imagery on the stone and I have been smiling ever since I found it.

“I’ve only ever seen things like this in the museum and it is a mysterious thing.

“It was dug up by local development workers at Barmuckity who didn’t know what it was and they dumped it on the side of this scrap land I walk through every day and after scraping away at it a bit, I found the images on it.”

The stone will be moved to Edinburgh for review and assessment in the next few weeks, it is understood.