Edinburgh and Livingston Burton's Biscuits factories set to be acquired by Ferrero linked company

CTH, a Belgian holding company related to the Ferrero Group, announced it has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Burton's Biscuit Company from the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board.

Tuesday, 1st June 2021, 4:46 pm

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Burton's currently employs around 2,000 people across six manufacturing locations in the UK and around 750 people at their site in West Edinburgh.

The proposed takeover is in the early stages and it is understood that no details relating to future plans for the sites have been released. But a statement from the prospective new owners said: “This acquisition will allow us to enlarge the products offered in the sweet biscuit market, fulfilling the evolving needs and trends of consumers.”

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Over the course of the last 12 months - Burton’s has generated sales of more than £275m.

The company produces some of the UK’s most loved brands including: Maryland Cookies, Jammie Dodgers, Wagon Wheels, Paterson's and Thomas Fudge's.

The business has a history in the British biscuit market dating back to 1935.

Ontario Teachers' acquired Burton's in 2013 and they say they had helped to grow the business through sustained investment across the branded, retailer brand and third-party global brand portfolios, in addition to organic initiatives and bolt-on acquisitions.

Famous biscuits from the Burton's line.

As part of the transaction, the Ferrero-related Company will take over the six production facilities in the United Kingdom, which are based in Blackpool, Dorset, Edinburgh, Livingston, Llantarnam and Isle of Arran.

Through this acquisition, the Ferrero-related Company expects to enlarge the offer of products in the sweet biscuits market, further to the previous acquisitions of Biscuits Delacre, Kelsen Group and Fox's.

The Ferrero Group and its related parties are the third player in the worldwide chocolate confectionery market and the second in the sweet biscuits market and may be more famously known for the production of Ferrero Rocher.

The Ferrero-related Company said: “Burton’s Biscuits is a much-loved, authentic and leading biscuits manufacturer who make some iconic brands such as “Wagon Wheels”, “Jammie Dodgers”, “Maryland” “Paterson’s”, “Thomas Fudge’s” and “Lyon’s”. This acquisition will allow us to enlarge the products offered in the sweet biscuit market, fulfilling the evolving needs and trends of consumers. We look forward to working with the team at Burton’s Biscuits as we build our journey together.”

Burton’s biscuits - Our History:

“The Burton’s story is a simple one, it’s about Great British Brands and Great British Biscuits. Their history can be traced back to George Burton (born in 1829) who began baking biscuits in Leek, Staffordshire in the mid 1800’s.

“In 1935 George’s grandson Joseph founded Burton’s Biscuits. Under the family’s stewardship, the Burton’s bakery grew swiftly and their biscuits and other snack foods became staples in UK households throughout the 1900’s.

“The seeds of Burton's focus on quality and innovative spirit were planted early on in the company’s history as it pioneered new manufacturing processes and technologies; along with its biscuits winning numerous accolades in international taste tests.

“In 2000, Burton’s Biscuit Company as we know it today was formed following the merger of the Horizon Biscuit Company Ltd. and Burton’s Gold Medal Biscuits. In 2013, Ontario Teachers’ Pension Plan bought Burton’s and we continued on our journey of baking great biscuits and snacks for every UK household and much further afield.”

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