Gambolling Livingston lambs are the future of Scotland's rarest breed

These adorable North Ronaldsay lambs were jumping for joy as they got out and about in the sunshine.

By Sarah Ward
Tuesday, 26th April 2022, 10:12 am
Updated Tuesday, 26th April 2022, 11:21 am

The three females and two males are living their best life at Almond Valley Heritage Centre in Livingston, West Lothian.

The siblings, aged between three days old and one week old, originated from the Island of North Ronaldsay, Orkney.

They maintain the flock book, established in 1974, which is the breed registry containing all purebred animals. This book reports that there are fewer than 600 breeding females and roughly 3700 sheep in total. The Rare Breeds Survival Trust (RBST) lists the North Ronaldsay as "vulnerable".

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Five adorable and very lively North Ronaldsay lambs have been born at Almond Valley Heritage Centre in Livingston, West Lothian.

They have unusual speckled coats and are one of the rarest sheep breeds in Britain.

The North Ronaldsay Sheep lives largely on a diet of seaweed, and the Boreray – which lives only on the St Kilda archipelago – is the UK's rarest sheep, having been listed as "Category 2: Endangered" by the RBST.

These adorable North Ronaldsay lambs were jumping for joy as they got out and about in the sunshine.