Edinburgh trams compenation to cyclists - your views online

City Council paid out £1.2 million over cycle accidents on Edinburgh tram tracks

Graeme Robertson

Edinburgh roads - a litigious person’s paradise. Get that public purse (council tax payers money) emptied to pay for CEC's complete dereliction of its basic duty.

Lorraine Blyth

Cyclists need to take some responsibility. If they believe the tramlines are “dangerous” then don’t cross them. If they are not confident in cycling near them, then change your route.

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Ken Randall

Grew up somewhere that had a lot of these old tracks and you learned to deal with them on your bike. Probably like most others at the time and for decades before me I did have a bad fall. It wasn't the fault of the tracks or the council, it was our own stupid fault cor not paying propper attention and cycling to conditions. There wasn't even a passing thought of blaming anyone else, never mind the idea of seeking compensation.

Diane Smith

Another stupid thing to do. Pay for this out of our hard earned cash. Cyclists shouldn't be on tram tracks in the first place.

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Gwen Gwen

Don’t know why they’re paying out for injuries when anyone with half a brain would know not to cycle on tram lines. Go figure!

Steven Ogilvie

Cyclists know the tram lines are dangerous. If you can't traverse them safely, find another route.

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Norry Colquhoun

Might be the time that roads with tramlines are not allowed to be used by cyclists. Surely there’s a proportion of them that can’t understand the safety measures required.

David Barr

Just back from Prague and Budapest - trams everywhere, bends crossing tracks. Our trams go in straight lines apart from the far end of Princes Street. It’s not the tram lines it’s partly the cyclists I think. CEC, instead of paying for injuries, have training for cyclists. Hi-vis lights and how to ride a bike in different conditions including if you encounter tram lines. Put up signs telling them to be aware and they ride near them at their own risk.

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Ken Bedingfield

Why don’t they watch where they are going? After all, motorists have to watch all the bollards for Spaces for People.

Dougie Reid

Common sense to keep eyes open for obstacles regardless of transport mode. I would think the state of Edinburgh’s roads /cycle lanes / pavements and constant roadworks are just a few things to be wary of.

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Gordon Paton

Absolutely no payments should be made. Cyclists are cycling without due care and attention otherwise none of these "accidents" would happen. They should be charged, not given compensation.

Kim Park

How does it work in places like Amsterdam? How do the cyclists avoid accidents, given there are so many bikes on the road, along with tramlines?

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Wilson Irene

Who in their right mind would ride a bike or motorbike on our seriously busy roads? Scary even being in a car on these roads now, but on two wheels you are taking your life in your hands.

Edinburgh Gaelic HS

Scottish Government accepts there's no suitable site, Education Convener claims

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Ray Thomson

Only practical use for Gaelic is to be able to read the Gaelic road signs which were put there in the first place by the useless SNP.

Euan Robert Brown

I’d be interested to know what causes this aversion to a modest proposal to teach one of Scotland’s unique languages in the nation’s capital. We should all learn Gaelic. Lots of young folks are learning it on Duolingo. It’s a great language and sufficiently different from English and Scots to really stimulate young minds. A real pity they can’t find a school if the demand is there.

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Wilma Bruce

Why do we want to learn a language that is no good to anyone except those who understand it and it will not get you a job?

Robbie Howie

Do we need a Gaelic School in Edinburgh? Sounds like a huge waste of money.

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William Findlay

Build it one of the crofting counties.

Ian Munro

The Gaelic primary school is in Bonnington yet pupils come from all over Edinburgh. I don't see the problem with a school at Liberton.

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Neil Robinson

Why? Gaelic is not the language of central and lowland Scotland. Teach foreign languages that might help future economies!

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