Almost all aspects of the council's transport strategy - parking, walking, cycling, public transport, road safety and air quality - are currently out to consultation with a deadline of July 9 for people to register their views.

It's all brought together in what the council calls the City Mobility Plan, but with "action plans" for each element.  Transport and environment convener Scott Arthur said: "This is people's chance to have a say on the big plan to take Edinburgh forward over the next ten years and make transport more sustainable, cut congestion and help us hit net zero. It's really important." 

Among the questions asked in the consultation are how far people support the proposed expansion of Edinburgh’s cycle network so that every household is within 250 – 400 metres of a high-quality cycle route; what they think about looking at more restrictions on through traffic in the city centre to help create a friendlier environment for people living, shopping, working and visiting; and whether they back a targeted reduction in kerbside parking in the city centre to provide a more welcoming environment for everyone.

People are also asked to rate the importance of measures such as creating more bus lanes, extending bus lane operating hours to 7am-7pm, redesigning major junctions to make them safer for vulnerable users, considering speed limits of under 20mph in busy shopping street, installing more benches and rest places, improving bus shelters with seating and lighting and removing street clutter like unnecessary poles and signs.Almost all aspects of the council's transport strategy - parking, walking, cycling, public transport, road safety and air quality - are currently out to consultation with a deadline of July 9 for people to register their views.

It's all brought together in what the council calls the City Mobility Plan, but with "action plans" for each element.  Transport and environment convener Scott Arthur said: "This is people's chance to have a say on the big plan to take Edinburgh forward over the next ten years and make transport more sustainable, cut congestion and help us hit net zero. It's really important." 

Among the questions asked in the consultation are how far people support the proposed expansion of Edinburgh’s cycle network so that every household is within 250 – 400 metres of a high-quality cycle route; what they think about looking at more restrictions on through traffic in the city centre to help create a friendlier environment for people living, shopping, working and visiting; and whether they back a targeted reduction in kerbside parking in the city centre to provide a more welcoming environment for everyone.

People are also asked to rate the importance of measures such as creating more bus lanes, extending bus lane operating hours to 7am-7pm, redesigning major junctions to make them safer for vulnerable users, considering speed limits of under 20mph in busy shopping street, installing more benches and rest places, improving bus shelters with seating and lighting and removing street clutter like unnecessary poles and signs.
Almost all aspects of the council's transport strategy - parking, walking, cycling, public transport, road safety and air quality - are currently out to consultation with a deadline of July 9 for people to register their views. It's all brought together in what the council calls the City Mobility Plan, but with "action plans" for each element. Transport and environment convener Scott Arthur said: "This is people's chance to have a say on the big plan to take Edinburgh forward over the next ten years and make transport more sustainable, cut congestion and help us hit net zero. It's really important." Among the questions asked in the consultation are how far people support the proposed expansion of Edinburgh’s cycle network so that every household is within 250 – 400 metres of a high-quality cycle route; what they think about looking at more restrictions on through traffic in the city centre to help create a friendlier environment for people living, shopping, working and visiting; and whether they back a targeted reduction in kerbside parking in the city centre to provide a more welcoming environment for everyone. People are also asked to rate the importance of measures such as creating more bus lanes, extending bus lane operating hours to 7am-7pm, redesigning major junctions to make them safer for vulnerable users, considering speed limits of under 20mph in busy shopping street, installing more benches and rest places, improving bus shelters with seating and lighting and removing street clutter like unnecessary poles and signs.

9 issues which Edinburgh council wants your opinion on, including transport strategy and new schools

Several consultations on key issues affecting Edinburgh’s future development will close within the next few weeks –but there is still time for people to have their say.

Plans for big changes in how people travel around the city, proposals for a new high school in Kirkliston and a new primary in Greendykes, as well as the regeneration of Granton waterfront and new rules about houses in multiple occupation – all are matters which the public is being invited to comment on before final decisions are made.

The council’s consultations on the two new schools end this week and several others within a week or two, but online questionnaires on the council’s consultation hub make it easy to respond to the proposals. And there are more consultations which people can take part in on there too.

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