ScotRail train strikes: Significant disruption to services expected over six consecutive Sundays

Key train services in Scotland will be cancelled every Sunday over a six week period as conductors strike over calls for overtime payment increases.

Thursday, 25th March 2021, 10:05 am

The industrial action, headed by the National Union of Rail, Maritime and Transport Workers (RMT), will start this weekend on Sunday, 28 March.

All ScotRail services which start or terminate at Inverness, Aberdeen, Perth, Dundee, Stirling, and Glasgow Queen Street High-Level will be cancelled, with many services from Edinburgh Waverley and Glasgow Central High-Level cancelled too.

RMT General Secretary Mick Cash said: “I have no doubt that our ScotRail members will show full support and stand shoulder to shoulder during the days of industrial action.

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"It's frankly disgusting that rather than recognising the issues at the heart of this dispute the company have resorted to disgraceful mud slinging.

"Staff at the front line who have put themselves at huge risk during this pandemic will take no lectures from company bosses who have kept themselves will clear from danger.

“We have made it clear that we will not allow ScotRail to divide the workforce and are demanding that ScotRail do what is fair and honour an enhanced rate for rest day working for all grades.”

Services are expected to resume as normal on the Mondays following each strike.

Passengers board a ScotRail train at Glasgow Central Station picture: John Devlin

A limited amount of bus replacement services for key workers working at University Hospital Hairmyres, Queen Margaret Hospital in Dunfermline and Victoria Hospital in Kirkcaldy will be provided.

Passengers affected can use tickets to travel either the day before or the day after the strike action – or alternatively seek a refund.

For more information about travel disruptions visit the ScotRail website here.

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