The Tattoo, barking dogs and ice cream vans among noise complaints reported to Edinburgh Council

Ice cream vans were reported to the noise complaints department at City of Edinburgh Council. Picture: Getty Images
Ice cream vans were reported to the noise complaints department at City of Edinburgh Council. Picture: Getty Images
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BARKING dogs, the Royal Military Tattoo and even the chimes of an ice cream van were all the subject of noise complaints to the City of Edinburgh council last year, new figures have revealed.

Capital residents were also annoyed by creaking laminate flooring, burglar alarms 
and passing trains in objections made to the local authority’s environmental 
health team according to a Freedom of Information (FOI) request.

The report reveals locals registered more than 1,100 noise complaints with the Council in 2018 - including one unhappy neighbour who was irked by the sound of an ice cream van in their street.

The complaint, made in the the EH8 postcode in May, was the only one of its kind during the year, according to the report. But others 
included hundreds of objections against construction noise in their area, while “entertainment noise,” commercial burglar alarms and domestic pets were also cited for being too loud.

Four complaints were registered about the noise created by the Capital’s world-renowned military showcase, but the environmental health team received just one objection to exploding fireworks, despite previous calls to end such displays over noise pollution concerns

City centre councillor Joanna Mowat has previously called for a ban on noisy city centre events, including popular silent disco tours, citing complaints from local residents.

She said more had to be done to protect locals, adding the local authority had to “engage better” with 
those living in the bustling city centre.

She said: “A lot of the issues I hear about from residents stem from poor communication and that goes both 
ways, with locals and with those providing these sorts of events.”

“Personally, I’m never in favour of more legislation. It tends to be difficult, time-consuming and usually results in a lot of unintended consequences.”

Cllr Mowat added: “These things just require better 
management through a 
combination of policy and engagement. We have to know exactly what people want from that and learn how to better manage noise in the city centre.”

Construction noise was by far the largest source of complaints, with over 500 registered during 2018.

Noise consultancy work, domestic noise, traffic and antisocial behaviour all attracted less than ten complaints to environmental health workers, the report added.

newsen@edinburghnews.com