Why no nativity scenes at M&S? - Readers' Letters

The other day a display of charity Christmas cards in Marks & Spencer caught my eye, However, when I looked through it something seemed to be missing. It took me a couple of minutes to work out what it was – not a single card related to the birth of Jesus, which is what Chrismas actually celebrates.

The Chrismas story remains an essential part of our culture, says a reader
The Chrismas story remains an essential part of our culture, says a reader

I could hardly believe that Marks had erased the nativity from their cards, so the following day I went back and searched all the other displays in the entire store: individual cards, multi-packs and even Christmas gift cards. In the end, I could only find a single card relating to the Christmas story.

The fact that Marks are only selling a single design relating to the nativity – no shepherds, wise men or angels – leads me to think that it was an afterthought.

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Although practising Christians are certainly a minority in the country these days, there is probably still a majority of people for whom Christianity is, if not our religion, still an essential part of our culture. Imagine Marks & Spencer treating a much smaller group,so shabbily – almost inconceivable. Christians and cultural conservatives, however, are a different matter. Offering only a single card relating to the Christmas story for sale is a disgrace: St Michael is really taking the Mickey.

Otto Inglis, Crossgates

SUVs in spotlight

We have been pondering what might be done locally, at no cost, and within the limited competencies of our local authority to address climate change.

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Here’s our best idea so far: The city states that three years from now no residents’ parking permits will be issued for SUVs. Replacing SUVs with smaller cars will effectively increase carriageway width, allowing freer moving, and hence less polluting, traffic flow. It will lower fuel demand. Smaller batteries will decrease the carbon cost of their manufacture. And the ex-SUV owners will be better off. Win,win, win! What reasonable person could possibly object?

David Hogg, Edinbugh

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Illuminating slides

Thank you for publishing some of the glass lantern slides accompanying your article (“Forgotten box of 19th century slides reveals ‘Magic Lantern’ view of city”, 30 October). At least some of the images were produced by W Wilson and Co. Mr Wilson was born in Banffshire and became a celebrated photographer and publisher in Aberdeen. Aberdeen University has a large collection of over 39,000 slides, some online, and provides dating information.

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George Washington Wilson used the trademark GWW which is seen in the image you published described as the first Royal Infirmary in Edinburgh. The Infirmary shown in Lauriston Place opened in 1879. The original Infirmary from 1729 was in Robertson’s Close where it gained its Royal Charter in 1736. It relocated and expanded to what is now Infirmary Street about 1741, before moving to Lauriston Place then on to Little France.

Alastair Murray, Edinburgh

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Ode to COP26

In the style of William McGonnagall...

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In the year 2021

To Glasgow all world leaders come

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(Except for Xi Jinping, and Putin,

But that's a detail barely worth disputing)

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To stop the blight of global warming.

It's not as if we've had no warning

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The science is there for all to see

(According to Attenborough and Greta T).

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We must save the whales, and the bats

(And hopefully control the rats)

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Our children's future is the prize

(So long as fuel duty doesnae rise)

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David Hunter, Edinburgh

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