Edinburgh Dog and Cat Home could be forced to close as energy bills soar this winter

Shelter receives no funding or any financial benefits and relies purely on the generosity of donors

Edinburgh Dog and Cat home has said it faces an uncertain future, with a staggering 800 per cent rise in gas and electricity bills threatening to bring the 140-year-old animal refuge “to its knees”.

According to the shelter on Seafield Road, electricity supplies next year will cost them an estimated £31,160, while the gas bill is expected to top £63,735.

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EDCH provides a loving shelter for hundreds of dogs and cats annually, but over the past 12-months has seen an unprecedented rise in pets requiring a home – due in part to owners surrendering their pets due to the drastic rise in the cost of living. This month alone, more than 80 owners have applied to give up their family pets – amounting to an incredible 46 per cent rise.

Edinburgh Dog and Cat home faces an uncertain future after a staggering 800 per cent rise in gas and electricity bills.

In a bid to stem the tide of surrender requests from owners, the charity was the first in Scotland to provide pet food to Foodbanks and now feeds 3,000 animals monthly via donations – the aim being to ensure families can keep their pets in a warm and caring home environment.

Facing a worsening situation this winter, EDCH has now begun lobbying both Scottish and UK Governments, seeking aid and assistance for the animal charity sector. Currently Edinburgh Dog and Cat Home receives no funding or any financial benefits from national or local government and relies purely on the generosity of donors, while developing small income streams such as training and animal first aid.

CEO Lindsay Fyffe-Jardine says the rise in energy costs alone “could be enough to bring the home to its knees this winter”. “We have made substantial savings through our own in-house cost-cutting, but what we cannot do is reduce the level of care we afford our animals. They are and always will be our priority.

“It takes gas and electricity to keep them warm and fed – but these horrendous increases are unprecedented. While we appreciate they are hitting everyone, and will start to hit others in the animal charity before long, we cannot simply try and absorb them through donations. We need to see positive action now to ensure the future of the Home – and the well-being of the animals in our care.'

Edinburgh Dog and Cat Home is enlisting the support of other animal charities and welfare organisations In a bid to bring about change.